Phosphate

Measurement of phosphate in serum and urine is mainly performed to detect disorders of kidneys, bones and parathyroid glands.

Reference Ranges

Serum / Plasma
Adults2.6 – 4.5 mg/dL0.84 – 1.45 mmol/L
Children / Adolescents
1 – 30 days3.9 – 7.7 mg/dL1.25 – 2.50 mmol/L
1 – 12 months3.5 – 6.6 mg/dL1.15 – 2.15 mmol/L
1 – 3 years3.1 – 6.0 mg/dL1.00 – 1.95 mmol/L
4 – 6 years3.3 – 5.6 mg/dL1.05 – 1.80 mmol/L
7 – 9 years3.0 – 5.4 mg/dL0.95 – 1.75 mmol/L
10 – 12 years3.2 – 5.7 mg/dL1.05 – 1.85 mmol/L
13 – 15 years2.9 – 5.1 mg/dL0.95 – 1.65 mmol/L
16 – 18 years2.7 – 4.9 mg/dL0.85 – 1.60 mmol/L
Urine
Children, Adults0.4 – 1.3 g/24h12.9 – 42.0 mmol/24h
Each laboratory should check if the reference ranges are transferable to its own patient population and determine own reference ranges if necessary. For diagnostic purposes, the results should always be assessed with the patient’s medical history, clinical examinations and other findings.

Increased in

  1. Renal insufficiency
  2. Hypoparathyroidism
  3. Childhood
  4. Hypocalcaemia
  5. Excess Vitamin D intake
  6. Acromegaly
  7. Bone metastasis
  8. Sarcoidosis
  9. Liver disease

Decreased in

  1. Hyperparathyroidism (primary)
  2. Vitamin D deficiency
  3. Malabsorption
  4. Administration of glucose (hyperalimentation)
  5. Hyperinsulinism
  6. Loss of phoshate in urine e.g. Fanconi’s syndrome
  7. Insulin treatment of diabetes ketoacidosis
  8. Rickets
  9. Protein losing enteropathy

Conversion

Use our conversion tool to quickly convert between conventional units and SI units

mg/dL
mmol/L

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