Iron

Iron is a component of hemoglobin, myoglobin and several enzymes. Increased iron levels lead to hemochromatosis and liver damage, decreased levels cause anemia.

Reference Ranges

Women
25 years37 – 165 µg/dL6.6 – 29.5 µmol/L
40 years23 – 134 µg/dL4.1 – 24.0 µmol/L
60 years39 – 149 µg/dL7.0 – 26.7 µmol/L
Pregnant women
12 th gestational week42 – 177 µg/dL7.6 – 31.6 µmol/L
At term25 – 137 µg/dL4.5 – 24.5 µmol/L
6 weeks postpartum16 – 150 µg/dL2.9 – 26.9 µmol/L
Men
25 years40 – 155 µg/dL7.2 – 27.7 µmol/L
40 years35 – 168 µg/dL6.3 – 30.1 µmol/L
60 years40 – 120 µg/dL7.2 – 21.5 µmol/L
Children
2 weeks63 – 201 µg/dL11 – 36 µmol/L
6 months28 – 135 µg/dL5 – 24 µmol/L
12 months35 – 155 µg/dL6 – 28 µmol/L
2 – 12 years22 – 135 µg/dL4 – 24 µmol/L
Each laboratory should check if the reference ranges are transferable to its own patient population and determine own reference ranges if necessary. For diagnostic purposes, the results should always be assessed with the patient’s medical history, clinical examinations and other findings.

Increased in

  1. Hemochromatosis
  2. Hemosiderosis of excessive iron intake
  3. Decreased formation of RBCs, e.g. thalassemia, pyridoxine deficiency anemia, aplastic anemia
  4. Haemolytic anemia
  5. Acute liver damage
  6. Iron poisoning
  7. Lead toxicity

Decreased in

  1. Iron-deficiency anemia (hypochromic, microcytic)
  2. Late pregnancy
  3. Chronic infections
  4. Menstruation
  5. Nephrosis
  6. Kwashiorkor

Conversion

Use our conversion tool to quickly convert between conventional units and SI units

µg/dL
µmol/L

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